Gail Turner
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Mostly Wax Resist
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Gail Turner studied Art History at Hollins College for two years, transferred to Pratt Institute where she majored in Interior Design for three years, and in her senior year, became an Art Education major. She taught Art for fifteen years at Harwich Junior-Senior High School on Cape Cod, and, in her spare time, in the evenings, on weekends, and during school vacations, she made pots. Eventually, clay got the best of her, along with the birth of her daughter, Jessica, and she graduated to making pots full time.


The study of Interior Design taught Gail that she did not want to design objects and spaces that someone else would make but rather that she wanted to design and make the object herself. Gail’s retail space allows people to watch her throwing pots on the wheel or maybe hand building one of her large lasagna pans among many other pieces. Gail is committed to making functional ware. Her pots are made with care and consideration for how they will be used, in hopes that these pots will become a part of everyday lives and routines. All of her pieces for food preparation or serving purposes are lead free, ovenproof, and both microwave and dishwasher safe, as Gail too does not enjoy spending her free time washing dishes.

Gail’s love of pattern comes through with her diverse methods of glazing. Many years were spent practicing the batik process on cloth and decorating Ukrainian eggs. Gail places great emphasis on the use of wax, a resist medium that allows for multiple layering of glaze colors, and which therefore provides an excellent opportunity for achieving patterns of varying degrees of complexity.

Gail’s website is meant to introduce you to the styles of clay work that she does. She encourages you to visit her retail gallery where she can be found hard at work at the wheel, and, all too often, covered in clay.

To read an article written about Gail by her daughter Jessica, please click here.

All text and images © 2012 Mill Stone Pottery